Acupuncture for Depression

Acupuncture for Depression

Being depressed can make you feel helpless. You’re not. Along with therapy and sometimes medication, there’s a lot you can do on your own to fight back. Changing your behavior — your physical activity, lifestyle, and even your way of thinking — are all-natural depression treatments. These tips can help you feel better — starting right now:

  • Set goals. When you’re depressed, you may feel like you can’t accomplish anything. That makes you feel worse about yourself. To push back, set daily goals for yourself.
  • It temporarily boosts feel-good chemicals called endorphins. It may also have long-term benefits for people with depression. Regular exercise seems to encourage the brain to rewire itself in positive ways, Cook says.
  • Eat healthy. There is no magic diet that fixes depression. It’s a good idea to watch what you eat, though. If depression tends to make you overeat, getting in control of your eating will help you feel better.
  • Although nothing is definitive, Cook says there’s evidence that foods with omega-3 fatty acids (such as salmon and tuna) and folic acid (such as spinach and avocado) could help ease depression.
  • Get enough sleep. Depression can make it hard to get enough shut-eye, and too little sleep can make depression worse.
  • What can you do? Start by making some changes to your lifestyle. Go to bed and get up at the same time every day. Try not to nap. Take all the distractions out of your bedroom — no computer and no TV. In time, you may find your sleep improves
  • Take on responsibilities. When you’re depressed, you may want to pull back from life and give up your responsibilities at home and at work. Don’t. Staying involved and having daily responsibilities can help you maintain a lifestyle that can help counter depression. They ground you and give you a sense of accomplishment.
  • If you’re not up to full-time school or work, that’s fine. Think about part-time. If that seems like too much, consider volunteer work.
  • Do something new. When you’re depressed, you’re in a rut. Push yourself to do something different. Go to a museum. Pick up a used book and read it on a park bench. Volunteer at a soup kitchen. Take a language class.
  • “When we challenge ourselves to do something different, there are chemical changes in the brain,” Cook says. “Trying something new alters the levels of dopamine, which is associated with pleasure, enjoyment, and learning.”
  • Try to have fun. If you’re depressed, make time for things you enjoy. What if nothing seems fun anymore? “That’s just a symptom of depression,” Cook says. You have to keep trying anyway.
  • As strange as it might sound, you have to work at having fun. Plan things you used to enjoy, even if they feel like a chore. Keep going to the movies. Keep going out with friends for dinner.
  • When you’re depressed, you can lose the knack for enjoying life, Cook says. You have to relearn how to do it. In time, fun things really will feel fun again.
  • Acupuncture may help ease depression symptoms, as well as treat the underlying condition, although more research is needed to confirm.
  • In one 2013 study, researchers found that electroacupuncture, a type of acupuncture that uses a mild electric current transmitted through the needles, was just as effective as fluoxetine (Prozac) in easing depression symptoms.
  • In another study, researchers examined the effect of acupuncture on sexual dysfunction, one of the most common antidepressant side effects. Both men and women in this study showed significant improvement after 12 weeks of acupuncture treatment.
  • Many Western healthcare providers question the efficacy of acupuncture. It’s not exactly a verifiable and science-based treatment. However, research does show that the needles from acupuncture treatments release endorphins in your body.

Reference:

https://www.webmd.com/depression/features/natural-treatments#1

https://www.healthline.com/health/depression/acupuncture-for-depression#in-western-medicine

Fake appetite acupuncture

Fake appetite acupuncture

The real trick to managing weight is to eat less, but not to feel hungry or deprived. Being hungry all the time is a death sentence for any weight loss program.

The desire to eat starts with a twinge, and before you know it, you’re rummaging through the fridge. But the real question is: Are you really hungry, or was that a twinge of habit, boredom, or some other emotion? Understanding your own eating habits and learning to recognize true hunger is an essential weight loss tool.

The decision to eat is affected by a host of factors: sights, smells, social settings, and more. We eat to satisfy our appetites but also to soothe emotions, celebrate victories, satisfy cultural expectations — and because it just tastes good.

Scientists have been researching influences on appetite and hunger for decades. The body’s systems are complex. “Hunger hormones” (ghrelin) in your blood and an empty stomach signal the brain when you’re hungry. Nerves in the stomach send signals to the brain that you’re full, but these signals can take up to 20 minutes to communicate — and by that time, you may have already eaten too much.

Ideally, hunger is the way we experience the body’s physiological need for energy and essential nutrients (carbohydrate, protein, fat, vitamins, minerals, etc.). Unfortunately, many people experience the sensation of hunger for foods rich in energy even though they have ample reserves of energy-containing fat.

Ideally, hunger is the way we experience the body’s physiological need for energy and essential nutrients (carbohydrate, protein, fat, vitamins, minerals, etc.). Unfortunately, many people experience the sensation of hunger for foods rich in energy even though they have ample reserves of energy-containing fat. Some people are always “hungry.” In order not to be ruled by false hunger (hunger for unnecessary or harmful substances), it is necessary to do two things: (1) learn to recognize the basis of your sensation of hunger and (2) educate your body not to send the wrong messages. False hunger falls into nine basic categories: (1) low blood sugar; (2) an irritation of the lining of the stomach; (3) addictions; (4) the discomfort of the body in utilizing reserves; (5) a desire for stimulation; (6) a genuine need for essential nutrients, expressed by a craving for food dilute in those nutrients; (7) tiredness experienced as a need for food; (8) thinking about, seeing, or smelling food; and (9) habituation to regularity.

The best way to deal with inappropriate cravings is first to experience them. Then attempt to objectively identify them. If, for example, you realize that your sensation of hunger is from an irritated stomach, that knowledge will be very helpful both in dealing with that problem and in quelling your craving. First cultivate the awareness that the hunger is false. Next, develop the tools and resolve to deal with it over the long term. Thus armed, it will be easier to dismiss any thought of eating the wrong food. Just think of how good you feel when you eat properly and are at the correct weight. Think of any health condition with which you may suffer or any excess weight you may be constantly carrying around. Analogously, if your house were always cluttered with unwanted junk, you would want to remedy this condition as soon as possible.

Next time you feel between-meal hunger creeping in head straight to your computer and find a funny video to watch. Often fake hunger sets in when we’re feeling drowsy or bored. It turns out laughter is a natural remedy for both issues.

When the urge to rummage through the fridge kicks in head for the bathroom and brush your teeth instead. This simple trick is often all it will take to dull your urge to graze. This brain hack works because we’re naturally creatures of habit. We typically brush our teeth only after we’re done eating a meal or before we climb into bed. So when you brush your teeth at a completely different time of the day to interrupt your fake hunger you’re simply harnessing your brain’s fondness for routine. Your brain gets the signal that you’re done eating, or ready to turn in for the night, and it dials back your appetite.

There’s a theory that putting these needles on the outer part of your ear stimulates various trigger points that may play a role in your appetite and metabolism,

However, the association between acupuncture and weight loss isn’t that cut and dry, says Tim Rhudy, MS, LAc, an acupuncturist at Delmar Wellness Centre in New York.

The reason? When you’re feeling stressed, your autonomic nervous system gives you a burst of adrenaline and floods your body with the hormone cortisol. This increases your appetite, potentially causing you to overeat.

With acupuncture, the needles – which are very small and flexible and not at all like the ones you see in your doctor’s office – work to release the tension in your muscles by releasing feel-good endorphins, which helps put you in a calmer state. Relieving this underlying stress, in theory, would help calm your appetite.

Reference:

https://www.webmd.com/diet/features/really-hungry#1

https://www.chuckrowtaichi.com/TrueVsFalseHunger.html

https://www.health24.com/Lifestyle/Man/Your-health/can-acupuncture-really-help-you-lose-weight-heres-what-you-should-know-20171128

OCD symptoms

OCD symptoms

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is an anxiety disorder characterized by uncontrollable, unwanted thoughts and ritualized, repetitive behaviors you feel compelled to perform. If you have OCD, you probably recognize that your obsessive thoughts and compulsive behaviors are irrational—but even so, you feel unable to resist them and break free. Like a needle getting stuck on an old record, OCD causes the brain to get stuck on a particular thought or urge.

Most people with OCD fall into one of the following categories:

  • Washers are afraid of contamination. They usually have cleaning or hand-washing compulsions.
  • Checkers repeatedly check things (oven turned off, door locked, etc.) that they associate with harm or danger.
  • Doubters and sinners are afraid that if everything isn’t perfect or done just right something terrible will happen, or they will be punished.
  • Counters and arrangers are obsessed with order and symmetry. They may have superstitions about certain numbers, colors, or arrangements.
  • Hoarders fear that something bad will happen if they throw anything away. They compulsively hoard things that they don’t need or use. They may also suffer from other disorders, such as depression, PTSD, compulsive buying, kleptomania, ADHD, skin picking, or tic disorders.

With OCD, these thoughts and behaviors cause tremendous distress, take up a lot of time (at least one hour per day), and interfere with your daily life and relationships.

Most people with obsessive-compulsive disorder have both obsessions and compulsions, but some people experience just one or the other.

Common obsessive thoughts in OCD include:

  • Fear of being contaminated by germs or dirt or contaminating others
  • Fear of losing control and harming yourself or others
  • Intrusive sexually explicit or violent thoughts and images
  • Excessive focus on religious or moral ideas
  • Fear of losing or not having things you might need
  • Order and symmetry: the idea that everything must line up “just right”
  • Superstitions; excessive attention to something considered lucky or unlucky

Common compulsive behaviors in OCD include:

  • Excessive double-checking of things, such as locks, appliances, and switches
  • Repeatedly checking in on loved ones to make sure they’re safe
  • Counting, tapping, repeating certain words, or doing other senseless things to reduce anxiety
  • Spending a lot of time washing or cleaning
  • Ordering or arranging things “just so”
  • Praying excessively or engaging in rituals triggered by religious fear
  • Accumulating “junk” such as old newspapers or empty food containers

No matter how overwhelming your OCD symptoms seem, there are many ways you can help yourself.

Don’t avoid your fears. It might seem smart to avoid the situations that trigger your obsessive thoughts, but the more you avoid them, the scarier they feel. Instead, expose yourself to your OCD triggers, then try to resist or delay the urge to complete your relief-seeking compulsive ritual. If resistance gets to be too hard, try to reduce the amount of time you spend on your ritual. Each time you expose yourself to your trigger, your anxiety should lessen and you’ll start to realize that you have more control (and less to fear) than you think.

Anticipate OCD urges. By anticipating your compulsive urges before they arise, you can help to ease them.

Refocus your attention. When you’re experiencing OCD thoughts and urges, try shifting your attention to something else. You could exercise, jog, walk, listen to music, read, surf the web, play a video game, make a phone call, or knit. The important thing is to do something you enjoy for at least 15 minutes.

Stay connected to family and friends. Obsessions and compulsions can consume your life to the point of social isolation. In turn, social isolation will aggravate your OCD symptoms. It’s important to invest in relating to family and friends. Talking face-to-face about your worries and urges can make them feel less real and less threatening.

Join an OCD support group. You’re not alone in your struggle with OCD, and participating in a support group can be an effective reminder of that.

Medication. Antidepressants are sometimes used in conjunction with therapy for the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder. However, medication alone is rarely effective in relieving the symptoms.

In Traditional Chinese Medicine, OCD is considered to be caused by an imbalance of the kidneys. When kidneys are not functioning properly, the body and mind can become stressed.

Acupuncture works by the specific placement of needles on different points throughout the body. These points work to release blockages in the body and return the body back to its natural flow and as a result, back to health. Acupuncture is known to lower stress and anxiety levels and calm the mind. When this happens, a person is less likely to have compulsive tendencies.

Reference:

Acupuncture for Obsessive Complusive Disorder (OCD)

https://www.helpguide.org/articles/anxiety/obssessive-compulsive-disorder-ocd.htm

Migraine symptoms and treatments

Migraine symptoms and treatments

A migraine can cause severe throbbing pain or a pulsing sensation, usually on just one side of the head. It’s often accompanied by nausea, vomiting, and extreme sensitivity to light and sound.

Migraine attacks can cause significant pain for hours to days and can be so severe that the pain is disabling.

Warning symptoms known as aura may occur before or with the headache. These can include flashes of light, blind spots, or tingling on one side of the face or in your arm or leg.

Symptoms

Migraines often begin in childhood, adolescence or early adulthood. Migraines may progress through four stages: prodrome, aura, headache and post-drome, though you may not experience all stages.

Prodrome:

One or two days before a migraine, you may notice subtle changes that warn of an upcoming migraine, including:

  • Constipation
  • Mood changes, from depression to euphoria
  • Food cravings
  • Neck stiffness
  • Increased thirst and urination
  • Frequent yawning

 Aura

Aura may occur before or during migraines. Most people experience migraines without aura. Auras are symptoms of the nervous system. They are usually visual disturbances, such as flashes of light or wavy, zigzag vision.

Sometimes auras can also be touching sensations (sensory), movement (motor) or speech (verbal) disturbances. Your muscles may get weak, or you may feel as though someone is touching you.

Each of these symptoms usually begins gradually, builds up over several minutes and lasts for 20 to 60 minutes. Examples of migraine aura include:

  • Visual phenomena, such as seeing various shapes, bright spots or flashes of light
  • Vision loss
  • Pins and needles sensations in an arm or leg
  • Weakness or numbness in the face or one side of the body
  • Difficulty speaking
  • Hearing noises or music
  • Uncontrollable jerking or other movements

Sometimes, a migraine with aura may be associated with limb weakness (hemiplegic migraine).

Attack

A migraine usually lasts from four to 72 hours if untreated. The frequency with which headaches occur varies from person to person. Migraines may be rare, or strike several times a month. During a migraine, you may experience:

  • Pain on one side or both sides of your head
  • Pain that feels throbbing or pulsing
  • Sensitivity to light, sounds, and sometimes smells and touch
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Blurred vision
  • Lightheadedness, sometimes followed by fainting

Post-drome

The final phase, known as post-drome, occurs after a migraine attack. You may feel drained and washed out, while some people feel elated. For about 24 hours, you may also experience:

  • Confusion
  • Moodiness
  • Dizziness
  • Weakness
  • Sensitivity to light and sound

There is currently no single cure for migraines. Treatment is aimed at preventing a full-blown attack, and alleviating the symptoms that occur.

Lifestyle alterations that might help reduce the frequency of migraines include:

  • getting enough sleep
  • reducing stress
  • drinking plenty of water
  • avoiding certain foods
  • regular physical exercise
  • Acupuncture seeks to restore the flow of positive energy throughout your body.
  • It also claims to remove negative energy that is causing you pain. From a modern medical perspective, acupuncture stimulates various systems of your body. This may trigger a healing response.
  • Acupuncture divides your body into a series of zones and pressure points. Acupuncture needles are inserted into different pressure points, depending on your symptoms. These needle points are usually near nerves in your body. The needle stimulates the nerves to release hormones, such as endorphins, that trigger a response from your body. This immune and circulation system stimulation is what proponents of acupuncture claim relieves migraines and tension headaches.

Reference:

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/migraine-headache/symptoms-causes/syc-20360201

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/148373.php

https://www.healthline.com/health/acupuncture-for-headaches#alternative-treatments

http://www.cochrane.org/CD001218/SYMPT_acupuncture-preventing-migraine-attacks

hormone imbalance signs and symptoms

hormone imbalance signs and symptoms

Hormones are your body’s chemical messengers. Produced in the endocrine glands, these powerful chemicals travel around your bloodstream telling tissues and organs what to do. They help control many of your body’s major processes, including metabolism and reproduction.

When you have a hormonal imbalance, you have too much or too little of a certain hormone. Even tiny changes can have serious effects throughout your whole body.

While some hormone levels fluctuate throughout your lifetime and may just be the result of natural aging, other changes occur when your endocrine glands get the recipe wrong.

Your hormones play an integral role in your overall health. Because of that, there’s a broad range of symptoms that could signal a hormonal imbalance. Your symptoms will depend on which hormones or glands aren’t working properly.

Common hormonal conditions affecting both men and women could cause any of the following symptoms:

  • weight gain
  • fatigue
  • increased sensitivity to cold or heat
  • constipation or more frequent bowel movements
  • dry skin
  • puffy face
  • unexplained weight loss (sometimes sudden)
  • increased or decreased heart rate
  • muscle weakness
  • frequent urination
  • increased thirst
  • muscle aches, tenderness, and stiffness
  • pain, stiffness, or swelling in your joints
  • thinning hair or fine, brittle hair
  • increased hunger
  • depression
  • decreased sex drive
  • nervousness, anxiety, or irritability
  • blurred vision
  • sweating
  • infertility
  • a fatty hump between the shoulders
  • rounded face
  • purple or pink stretch marks

Symptoms in women

In women, the most common hormonal imbalance is polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Your normal hormonal cycle also changes naturally during:

  • puberty
  • pregnancy
  • breastfeeding
  • menopause

Symptoms of a hormonal imbalance specific to women include:

  • heavy or irregular periods, including missed periods, stopped period, or frequent period
  • hirsutism, or excessive hair on the face, chin, or other parts of the body
  • acne on the face, chest, or upper back
  • thinning hair or hair loss
  • weight gain or trouble losing weight
  • darkening of skin, especially along neck creases, in the groin, and underneath breasts
  • skin tags
  • vaginal dryness
  • vaginal atrophy
  • pain during sex
  • night sweats

Everything You Should Know About Hormonal Imbalance

Medically reviewed by Janet Brito, PhD, LCSW, CST on December 18, 2017 — Written by Corinne O’Keefe Osborn

  • Symptoms
  • Causes
  • Diagnosis
  • Treatment
  • Natural remedies
  • Acne
  • Weight gain
  • Pregnancy
  • Hair loss
  • Other complications
  • Takeaway

What is a hormonal imbalance?

Hormones are your body’s chemical messengers. Produced in the endocrine glands, these powerful chemicals travel around your bloodstream telling tissues and organs what to do. They help control many of your body’s major processes, including metabolism and reproduction.

When you have a hormonal imbalance, you have too much or too little of a certain hormone. Even tiny changes can have serious effects throughout your whole body.

Think of hormones like a cake recipe. Too much or too little of any one ingredient affects the final product. While some hormone levels fluctuate throughout your lifetime and may just be the result of natural aging, other changes occur when your endocrine glands get the recipe wrong.

Read on to learn more about hormonal imbalances.

Symptoms of a hormonal imbalance

Your hormones play an integral role in your overall health. Because of that, there’s a broad range of symptoms that could signal a hormonal imbalance. Your symptoms will depend on which hormones or glands aren’t working properly.

Common hormonal conditions affecting both men and women could cause any of the following symptoms:

  • weight gain
  • fatigue
  • increased sensitivity to cold or heat
  • constipation or more frequent bowel movements
  • dry skin
  • puffy face
  • unexplained weight loss (sometimes sudden)
  • increased or decreased heart rate
  • muscle weakness
  • frequent urination
  • increased thirst
  • muscle aches, tenderness, and stiffness
  • pain, stiffness, or swelling in your joints
  • thinning hair or fine, brittle hair
  • increased hunger
  • depression
  • decreased sex drive
  • nervousness, anxiety, or irritability
  • blurred vision
  • sweating
  • infertility
  • a fatty hump between the shoulders
  • rounded face
  • purple or pink stretch marks

Symptoms in women

In women, the most common hormonal imbalance is polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Your normal hormonal cycle also changes naturally during:

  • puberty
  • pregnancy
  • breastfeeding
  • menopause

Symptoms of a hormonal imbalance specific to women include:

  • heavy or irregular periods, including missed periods, stopped period, or frequent period
  • hirsutism, or excessive hair on the face, chin, or other parts of the body
  • acne on the face, chest, or upper back
  • thinning hair or hair loss
  • weight gain or trouble losing weight
  • darkening of skin, especially along neck creases, in the groin, and underneath breasts
  • skin tags
  • vaginal dryness
  • vaginal atrophy
  • pain during sex
  • night sweats

Symptoms in men

Testosterone plays an important role in male development. If you aren’t producing enough testosterone, it can cause a variety of symptoms.

In the adult male, symptoms include:

  • development of breast tissue
  • breast tenderness
  • erectile dysfunction
  • loss of muscle mass
  • decreased sex drive
  • infertility
  • decrease in beard and body hair growth
  • osteoporosis, the loss of bone mass
  • difficulty concentrating
  • hot flashes

1- 3 Causes of a hormonal imbalance

There are many possible causes for a hormonal imbalance. Causes differ depending on which hormones or glands are affected. Common causes of hormonal imbalance include:

  • diabetes
  • hypothyroidism, or underactive thyroid
  • hyperthyroidism, or overactive thyroid
  • hypogonadism
  • Cushing syndrome
  • thyroiditis
  • hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules
  • hormone therapy
  • tumors (benign or cancerous)
  • congenital adrenal hyperplasia
  • eating disorders
  • medications
  • stress
  • adrenal insufficiency
  • pituitary tumor
  • injury or trauma
  • cancer treatments

Acupuncture is a natural method of restoring balance to the hormones, and researchers such as Dr. Q.W. Xie have documented the direct effects acupuncture has on hormonal production.

By placing needles at key channels of energy, certain organs (including glands) can be stimulated and a person’s qi redirected.

Reference:

https://www.healthline.com/health/hormonal-imbalance

acupuncture for pocrescophobia

acupuncture for pocrescophobia

Pocrescophobia is the morbid and irrational fear of gaining weight. This phobia often stems from other psychological issues, which will be discussed further down. It is most often people who are pressured to be fit and thin that develop this phobia, such as aesthetic athletes (ex. dancers, cheerleaders, ice skaters, etc.). This phobia is usually seen in women, although many men have this phobia as well.

Symptoms of Pocrescophobia
Symptoms of Pocrescophobia will vary from one person to the next, depending upon their state of mind, level of fear, and various personality characteristics. General symptoms, though, include avoidance of food, obsession with weight loss, avoidance of scales, guilt when eating, and not feeling hungry.

Pocrescophobia could also lead to the develop of various eating disorders, namely Bulimia nervosa or Anorexia nervosa. Bulimia is a condition where the person overeats and then purges immediately after, usually by self-induced vomiting. Anorexia, on the other hand, is a condition where the person simply does not eat. Both of these could also be coupled with excessive exercise.

If a person with Pocrescophobia happens to find out that they have gained weight, even just the smallest amount, they may begin to suffer from a panic attack. Panic attacks are states of extreme terror and anxiety which also include rapid heart rate, breathing difficulties, weakness, fainting, dizziness, tingling or numbness, excessive sweating, chills, feeling a loss of control, and chest pain.

Causes of Pocrescophobia
Causes of Pocrescophobia can be very tricky, and will be different from one individual to another. Again, Pocrescophobia often occurs alongside an eating disorder, such as Bulimia or Anorexia. While the phobia can lead to these conditions, some people are also psychologically predisposed to developing them. For these people, the phobia of gaining weight is very likely to occur.

Obesity is also a cause of numerous other health problems, and even death in some cases. Someone who experienced the death of a loved one because of gaining weight will be terrified of getting to the state, themselves.

Low self-esteem could also be the cause of Pocrescophobia. In today’s society, beauty is marked by how thin someone is. For those people who really buy into these messages, they will be terrified of gaining weight in relation to the fear of being deemed “undesirable”.

Treatments Pocrescophobia
Treatments will also vary from person to person. Typically, therapy is a great go to. Various forms of therapy can help get to the bottom of the phobia, as well as treat it. Social therapy is also a great method for building self-esteem.

Medication is useful for treating anxiety, as well as other symptoms (ex. rapid heart rate, breathing difficulties, etc.). This can be taken on a daily basis or just during a panic attack.

Lastly, rehabilitation centers for eating disorders are a great way to combat Pocrescophobia. These centers offer a warm and comforting environment to those who fear gaining weight or have low self-esteem.

The acupuncture treatment is not only meant to heal a person from a particular phobia, but also, the treatment is extremely needed to regulate a stable balance in your emotional, spiritual and physical condition. The acupuncture treatment in a phobic individual does wonders by invigorating and upgrading the level of energy in a person’s body. A considerable positive difference can be noticed in a phobic individual post acupuncture treatment. The acupuncture treatment in a phobic individual does wonders by invigorating and upgrading the level of energy in a person’s body. A considerable positive difference can be noticed in a phobic individual post acupuncture treatment.

It is considered that acupuncture can have a positive effect on brain chemistry. At the beginning of a treatment the needles stimulate blood flow locally, which has the knock on effect of an increase in both nutrients and immune cells. During acupuncture endorphins are also released.
The treatment will generally strengthen the nervous system as well as the immune and hormonal system. It will bring the entire system back into a more balanced and healthier state of being

Reference:

http://yinova.wixsite.com/acupuncturemedicine/acupuncture-to-treat-phobias

http://ezinearticles.com/?Treating-Phobias-With-Acupuncture—Is-There-Any-Point?&id=7277172

Natural cellulite treatment

Natural cellulite treatment

Women are more prone to develop cellulite than men for three primary reasons:

  • Hormonal changes that weaken the fibrous tissues surrounding fat cells and negatively affect the skin’s support structures. These effects are normally seen between the ages of 25-35, when women’s estrogen levels naturally decline. This causes a loss of blood vessel receptors in the thigh and hip regions, and less circulation means less nutrition to the area, which blunts collagen production (resulting in weaker skin and connective tissues). Menstrual cycles also play a role, because women’s bodies release an enzyme before that breaks down collagen.
  • They naturally hold more fat than men, and particularly in the “stubborn” regions that are most affected by cellulite. Research has shown that females aren’t as good at oxidizing fat as men, and it’s possible that estrogen levels play a role as well.
  • Their fat cells are distributed in vertical columns, which are more prone to bulging, whereas men are arranged in a denser, net-like pattern that is resistant to pitting.

Cellulite also gets worse with age. The fibrous connective tissues (septae as they’re known) stiffen and the skin loosens, making the “mattress look” becomes even more pronounced.

The following “cures” for cellulite don’t work:

  • Cellulite shoes. These ridiculous looking sneakers will make walking a chore, causing you to wobble around like a drunk. What they won’t do, however, is help treat cellulite.
  • Cellulite creams. These products contain various substances that are supposed to inhibit fat storage in the areas where cellulite is worst. Well, it’s BS–if we could only rub a cream on our body and inhibit fat storage. Instead, these creams usually just induce temporary swelling, which reduces the appearance of cellulite…until the effect wears off.
  • Cellulite massage contraptions. These are supposed to “break up the fat cells” and while they may temporarily improve the appearance of the areas, they don’t deliver long-term results.

Reducing the appearance of cellulite requires that you do three things:

  • Address the health of the connective tissues and the collagen in the skin. The weaker and stiffer these tissues are, and the looser the skin is, the more prominent cellulite becomes. By improving the health and elasticity of these tissues, you can reduce the visibility of the cellulite.
  • Lose body fat. The more fat you have in the affected areas, the more exaggerated the cellulite will look. By losing fat, you’re taking the pressure off the surrounding tissues, which naturally reduces the severity of the pitting.
  • Increase blood and lymph circulation. Poor circulation and lymph drainage (lymph is a substance your body uses to dispose of waste) can lead to inflammation and swelling, which directly aggravates the problem, and it also inhibits the reparation of the connective tissues and collagen that play vital roles in the appearance of the skin. If blood and lymph flow remain decreased for extended periods of time, hardened collagen bands can actually form around the fat globules, further worsening the cellulite and making it even harder to get rid of.
  • Another cellulite-related benefit of weightlifting is that as your muscles grow, every area of your body naturally tightens, giving you a smoother, fuller look (and avoiding the dreaded “skinny fat” physique).
  • Among omega-3’s many benefits are the fact that it stimulates collagen production and reduces inflammation, which can help with the reduction of cellulite.
  • Acupuncture is a safe, natural way to help eliminate cellulite. Even though cellulite affects your outward appearance, it appears in the deeper layer of your skin. That’s why external treatments like topical creams or diet and exercise cannot effectively deal with the problem on their own. This is why acupuncture is an important part of the solution in the fight against cellulite. Acupuncture effects are nourishing connective tissues from within, cleanses and improves circulation, smooths and firms skin, and improves skin tone, focussing on problem areas, improves metabolic function, detoxifies tissues, relieves stress, promotes elimination of fat and cellulite, activates fluid circulation, helps to eliminate “orange peel” appearance.

Reference:

http://www.balancedacupuncture.ca/what-is-cellulite-acupuncture/

How to Get Rid of Cellulite Naturally and Safely

Seasonal allergies

Seasonal allergies

Symptoms of running nose, sneezing, and watery itchy eyes that recur during specific parts of the year (especially Spring and Fall) are a cause of much suffering of a large segment of the U.S. population. Millions of dollars are spent on medications and the allergy shots for the treatment of seasonal allergies. Western medicine views seasonal allergies as a form of immediate hypersensitivity reaction which occurs when anti-bodies produced by lymphocytes interact with airborne particles such as pollen.

Western medicine describes the locations of lymphocytes in addition to being in the blood stream as also in Peyer’s patches in the gastrointestinal tract, spleen, lymph nodes, and bone marrow. Interestingly in my practice of acupuncture the Spleen, Stomach, and Large Intestine meridians are utilized a great deal.

Researchers at the University Medical Center in Berlin conducted a large, multi-center study of the effectiveness of acupuncture for the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis, or hay fever. The study divided 422 people into three groups for two months: one group received acupuncture treatment, the second received “fake” acupuncture, with needles placed in random, meaningless spots on their bodies, and the third group only took antihistamines. At the end of the study, the group that received acupuncture therapy reported greater relief from symptoms than the other two groups.

While there are many Western medications to treat the symptoms of seasonal allergies, these treatments can cause unwanted side effects, such as drowsiness and immune system suppression as well as an over-reliance on medications. These side effects have drawn many people to search for an alternative approach, such as acupuncture and Oriental medicine to manage their allergies. One study recently published in the American Journal of Epidemiology showed that acupuncture can significantly relieve allergic rhinitis symptoms.

Acupuncture focuses on restoring balance to the body, improving immune system functioning, helping to relieve pain, reducing stress, enhancing blood circulation, and promoting overall health and well being in adults and children. It is a natural therapy that does not requires any drug and is highly effective when performed by an experienced practitioner.

Reference:

http://www.medicalacupuncture.org/For-Patients/Articles-By-Physicians-About-Acupuncture/Acupuncture-and-Seasonal-Allergies

https://www.healthline.com/health/allergies/acupuncture#allergies-and-ecz

Instruction for weight loss

Instruction for weight loss

To lose weight, we need to eat and drink fewer kilojoules that we use.

  • Don’t skip breakfast: Skipping breakfast won’t help you lose weight. You could miss out on essential nutrients and you may end up snacking more throughout the day because you feel hungry.
  • Eat regular meals: Eating at regular times during the day helps burn calories at a faster rate. It also reduces the temptation to snack on foods high in fat and sugar.
  • Eat plenty of fruit and veg: Fruit and veg are low in calories and fat, and high in fibre – 3 essential ingredients for successful weight loss. They also contain plenty of vitamins and minerals.
  • Get more active: Being active is key to losing weight and keeping it off. As well as providing numerous health benefits, exercise can help burn off the excess calories you can’t cut through diet alone.
  • Drink plenty of water: People sometimes confuse thirst with hunger. You can end up consuming extra calories when a glass of water is really what you need.
  • Eat high-fibre foods: Foods containing lots of fibre can help keep you to feel full, which is perfect for losing weight. Fibre is only found in food from plants, such as fruit and veg, oats, wholegrain bread, brown rice and pasta, and beans, peas and lentils.
  • Don’t ban foods: Don’t ban any foods from your weight loss plan, especially the ones you like. Banning foods will only make you crave them more. There’s no reason you can’t enjoy the occasional treat as long as you stay within your daily calorie allowance.

“Acupuncture supports weight loss from many different angles,” says Jennifer Oh, MS, an acupuncture practitioner in New York. One of the most important ways, she says, is by giving your metabolism a boost by helping regulate your digestion, insulin, and hormones.

This boost can also help suppress appetite, says Oh. “Hunger is a sign you are low in energy,” she says, so when those levels become more stable, you shouldn’t feel as ravenous.

Reference:

https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/healthy-weight/12-tips-to-help-you-lose-weight/

https://www.prevention.com/weight-loss/a20141511/acupuncture-for-weight-loss/

The most common causes of obesity

The most common causes of obesity

The balance between calorie intake and energy expenditure determines a person’s weight. If a person eats more calories than he or she burns (metabolizes), the person gains weight (the body will store the excess energy as fat). If a person eats fewer calories than he or she metabolizes, he or she will lose weight. Therefore, the most common causes of obesity are overeating and physical inactivity.

  • A person is more likely to develop obesity if one or both parents are obese. Genetics also affect hormones involved in fat regulation. For example, one genetic cause of obesity is leptin deficiency. Leptin is a hormone produced in fat cells and in the placenta. Leptin controls weight by signaling the brain to eat less when body fat stores are too high. If, for some reason, the body cannot produce enough leptin or leptin cannot signal the brain to eat less, this control is lost, and obesity occurs. The role of leptin replacement as a treatment for obesity is under exploration.
  • Overeating leads to weight gain, especially if the diet is high in fat. Foods high in fat or sugar (for example, fast food, fried food, and sweets) have high energy density (foods that have a lot of calories in a small amount of food). Epidemiologic studies have shown that diets high in fat contribute to weight gain. Drinking too much alcohol – alcohol contains a lot of calories, and people who drink heavily are often overweight.
  • Lack of physical activity. Lack of physical activity is another important factor related to obesity. Many people have jobs that involve sitting at a desk for most of the day. They also rely on their cars, rather than walking or cycling. For relaxation, many people tend to watch TV, browse the internet or play computer games, and rarely take regular exercise. If you’re not active enough, you don’t use the energy provided by the food you eat, and the extra energy you consume is stored by the body as fat.
  • Medications associated with weight gain include certain antidepressants (medications used in treating depression), anticonvulsants (medications used in controlling seizures such as carbamazepine [Tegretol, Tegretol XR, Equetro, Carbatrol] and valproate [Depacon, Depakene]), some diabetes medications (medications used in lowering blood sugar such as insulin, sulfonylureas, and thiazolidinediones), certain hormones such as oral contraceptives, and most corticosteroids such as prednisone. Some high blood pressure medications and antihistamines cause weight gain. The reason for the weight gain with the medications differs for each medication. Diseases such as hypothyroidism, insulin resistance, polycystic ovary syndrome, and Cushing’s syndrome are also contributors to obesity. Some diseases, such as Prader-Willi syndrome, can lead to obesity.
  • Social issues. There is a link between social issues and obesity. Lack of money to purchase healthy foods or lack of safe places to walk or exercise can increase the risk of obesity.

Recent studies have shown that when acupuncture is combined with traditional methods of weight loss, patients lose more weight. In these cases, one to three acupuncture weight loss sessions can be safe and effective in helping people achieve reasonable weight loss goals.

Acupuncture involves the insertion of very fine, sterile needles at specific body points or “energy pathways.” The inserted needles act to stimulate the release of endorphins, the body’s natural “feel good” hormones. This can create a calming, relaxing effect, which counteracts the need for excessive eating brought about by increased stress, frustration or anxiety.

The effect of acupuncture on a client’s emotions also plays an important role in aiding weight loss. Acupuncture affects the neuroendocrine system by blocking harmful neurochemicals to restore the natural balance of hormones and neurotransmitter levels. The resulting release of endorphins helps to reduce stress, which in turn helps to prevent the urge to overeat.

Reference:

https://www.medicinenet.com/obesity_weight_loss/article.htm#what_causes_obesity

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/obesity/causes/